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    There's nothing like using fresh herbs from the garden when cooking. Fresh herbs can elevate dishes from the ordinary to the extraordinary. Get adventurous and infuse your own oil (great for gifts that have that personal touch) or use herbs to create refreshing drinks bursting with flavour. Whether you're a beginner or a seasoned herb grower here's some of our top picks for your herb garden. Read on and you'll be growing your own in no time!

    Feeling Inspired? Come on in to Uscape and browse our full range, our lovely garden gurus are on hand to answer any questions and offer great advice to help you get the most out of your garden!

    For your convenience these are separated into the following planting seasons: Autumn/Winter Planting & Spring/Summer Planting. 

     

    Autumn/Winter Planting

     

    Bay Laurel

    Bay Laurel is a dense evergreen shrub or small tree with leathery pointed leaves. Small clusters of small, cream-yellow flowers appear in spring followed by dark purple berries. Bay Laurel is suited to the hot, dry summers and mild winters we experience here in WA. They prefer well-drained soil in sun or partial shade and, if established over winter, will grow very well with only two water applications a week in summer. A versatile plant it can be included in the garden as a centrepiece, used for a formal entrance or hedge or as a feature patio plant. Bay leaves can deter weevils so a leaf included in rice and flour canisters or taped to the inside of a pantry will help deter these insects from the kitchen. The leaves of Bay Laurel are an important ingredient in bouquet garni, which simply means “a bunch of herbs”. These would be tied together with string and added to soups, casserole or stews to impart their flavour and then discarded before the meal is served.

    Chives

     A perennial herb loved for the delightful onion or garlic flavour of their leaves, chives are a member of the onion family and are much easier to grow than traditional onions and garlic (with the added benefit of a much shorter wait time before harvesting). Plant in full sun to part shade, protected from strong winds and water well to ensure the root system is well hydrated and mulch well to retain moisture. Chives are ideal plants for pots (at least 30cm wide), make attractive grass-like plants in herb beds and can be used as pest repellent plants as well. Eat leaves fresh or chop up excess and freeze. To encourage continuous growth of leaves, cut off the flowers; they are edible too so toss them in a salad to dress it up.

    Coriander 

    Coriander grows best where the climate is hot and humid so growing from autumn to spring is usually the most successful.  Coriander decide go to seed if the weather turns from hot to cold (or cold to hot etc) and will send up flower heads from the centre of the plant. This is one of the reasons that people have trouble growing coriander, especially if they decide to transplant it in to a larger pot as this is also changing the conditions in which the plant is growing. You can minimise this by growing slow bolt varieties, or buy your plants when they are seedlings to minimise transplant shock. All parts of coriander can be used in cooking. Use the leaves, roots and seeds (ground) to flavour a variety of Asian and Mexican dishes.

    Lemon Balm

    Lemon Balm is a spreading perennial herb with bright green leaves with a delicious lemon scent. Start harvesting the leaves as soon as plant is large enough and cut it right back every year to maintain bush shape.Attracts bees so plant amongst your vegetable garden. Leaves can be used fresh, dry or can be frozen.
    Fantastic to use with chicken or fish by adding leaves when baking.Freeze in ice cubes and add to cold drinks for a delicious and refreshing twist. 

    Mint

    Mint loves moisture and most are perennials with an invasive tendency so we recommend that you plant mint in pots instead of the garden. Any large container is suitable as long as the potting mix used is able to hold moisture well. If rust appears or plant looks lanky, cut down very hard and cover with compost and throw leaves in bin.  Mint is so versatile in the kitchen from adding to peas. potatoes, mint sauce for a lamb roast, try adding a few mint leaves to green tea or mocktails and cocktails.
    Fresh or dried mint will also deter ants from the pantry and repel clothes moth.

    Oregano

    Oregano is a hardy, spreading, perennial ground cover with woody stems and leaves that turn deep yellow when in full sun in summer. To get the best results use organic compost around the centre of the plant in winter which will encourage new growth come spring. Oregano is best harvested in warmer months and used fresh although leaves can be dried and used all year round. Great used in Italian dishes and Mediterranean cuisine, pair with most meats, lovely in soups and with fish. other uses are to use this plant as a ground cover where it will act as a "living mulch" or use it in rockeries for a lovely effect.

    Parsley Curly

    This biennial variety has crisp, tightly curled foliage with a dark green colour and vigorous growth habit. For great results remember to add lots of organic matter and water well and let the plant self -seed in its second year of growth. By harvesting the outside leaves frequently you will encourage new growth from the centre of the plant. Parsley is reputed to have the richest source of iron of any vegetable so it is definitely worth considering for your garden. Leaves can be used in a variety of ways, to add freshness to sauces & dressings, as a garnish or in Italian or Mediterranean style dishes. Great mixed with butter and garlic for garlic bread or over meat. Leaves can be either dried, frozen or fresh. Other uses include using fresh parlsey to freshen breath.

    Parsley Italian

    Also known as Continental Parsley this biennial variety has plain, flat leafed foliage with a dark green colour and vigorous growth. For great results remember to add lots of organic matter and water well and let the plant self -seed in its second year of growth. By harvesting the outside leaves frequently you will encourage new growth from the centre of the plant. Parsley is reputed to have the richest source of iron of any vegetable so it is definitely worth considering for your garden. This variety is often preferred for cooking because it has a smoother, stronger flavour than curly variety. Leaves can be used in a variety of ways, to add freshness to sauces & dressings, as a garnish or in Italian or Mediterranean style dishes. Great mixed with butter and garlic for garlic bread or over meat. Leaves can be either dried, frozen or fresh. Other uses include using fresh parlsey to freshen breath.

    Rocket

    Rocket is an oily-peppery flavoured salad green with long toothed, purplish-green foliage and a mustard like taste.It is a very fast growing annual so its great if you're wanting quick results. Harvest the leaves when they are young (approx under 10cm long) as they can become bitter after flowering. Rocket may self-seed in other parts of the garden but it’s easy to remove if needed. Rocket grows best in the cooler months as heat can cause the plant to bolt to seed and the better the soil, the better the results. Great to use in salad dishes or with eggs for a fresh take on breakfast. use in pastas burgers, sandwiches and our personal fave sprinkled uncooked over fresh cooked pizza. 

    Rosemary

    Rosemary is an evergreen, perennial, woody shrub with needle like, glossy green leaves and pale blue flowers in spring. It is very hardy and will tolerate drought and salty environments. Rosemary also is an excellent hedging plant. to get the best flavour, plant rosemary in full sun,keep it on the drier side and don’t fertilise. Great for repelling mosquitos so plant them around your alfresco entertaining area. Harvest at any time by cutting the stems at your desired length. Use fresh or dry by hanging in bunches in warm, airy room. fantastic to use with lamb and other meats, in marinades & dressings. Infuse in olive oil for a wonderful flavoured oil or a novel idea is to use cut stems as meat or vegetable skewers on the barbecue.

    Sage

    Small, woody perennial shrub with velvety, grey-green leaves and pink flowers in spring. For best results give your sage plant a deep soaking once a week and provide a complete fertiliser in spring.You can start harvesting the sage leaves early. Sage will attract nectar-loving birds and butterflies to your garden.Leaves can be dried or frozen for up to 6 months. Sage leaves are lovely to use in stuffings, with meat especially white meat like pork or chicken.

    Thyme

    Thyme prefers plenty of sun and don’t feed or water it too much as it needs the chance to develop the oil in its leaves which gives it the flavour that we want in cooking. If it gets leggy, prune it back by about half and then cover the base of it with compost or potting mix which will help to rejuvenate it so that it will last for many years. Thyme is great to use in many Italian dishes, especially in tomato based sauces. This herb can also be used in landscaping as it makes a great ground cover when mass planted and its colours offset other plants beautifully.

     

     Spring/Summer Planting

    Basil Sweet

    Sweet Basil is one of the most popular variety of all basils. This annual herb has large shiny green leaves, packed with flavour and scented oils, and white lowers over summer. Harvest frequently and remove flowers to encourage new growth. The stems of sweet basil are actually more flavoursome than the leaves so should be included in cooking.
    The more basil is harvested, the more it should be fertilised to get the best results and add lots of organic matter. Plant near tomato to improve growth. Great to use in bruschetta, salads, tomato dishes, sauces, herb oils ,pesto and pasta the list goes on!
    Basil is great for repelling insects so plant several around the alfresco area or rub the leaves on your skin as a mosquito repellent. 

    Basil Thai

    Thai Basil has a subtle anise flavour, its smallish dark green leaves are full of flavour and scented oils with purple flowers. Harvest this annual herb frequently and remove flowers to encourage new growth. The more basil is harvested, the more it should be fertilised. Add lots of organic matter. 
    As with other basil varieties,the stems of Thai Basil are also full of flavour and can be used in Thai and Indonesian dishes. Great to use leaves in Asian salads and cooked dishes as well as sauces and herb oils. 

    Chives

     A perennial herb loved for the delightful onion or garlic flavour of their leaves, chives are a member of the onion family and are much easier to grow than traditional onions and garlic (with the added benefit of a much shorter wait time before harvesting). Plant in full sun to part shade, protected from strong winds and water well to ensure the root system is well hydrated and mulch well to retain moisture. Chives are ideal plants for pots (at least 30cm wide), make attractive grass-like plants in herb beds and can be used as pest repellent plants as well. Eat leaves fresh or chop up excess and freeze. To encourage continuous growth of leaves, cut off the flowers; they are edible too so toss them in a salad to dress it up.

     

     

     

     

    Coriander (Early Spring)

    Coriander grows best where the climate is hot and humid so growing from autumn to spring is usually the most successful.  Coriander decide go to seed if the weather turns from hot to cold (or cold to hot etc) and will send up flower heads from the centre of the plant. This is one of the reasons that people have trouble growing coriander, especially if they decide to transplant it in to a larger pot as this is also changing the conditions in which the plant is growing. You can minimise this by growing slow bolt varieties, or buy your plants when they are seedlings to minimise transplant shock. All parts of coriander can be used in cooking. Use the leaves, roots and seeds (ground) to flavour a variety of Asian and Mexican dishes.

     

    Dill

     Dill is an annual herb with a slight aniseed flavour, blue-green leaves with a bushy habit. It deveopes umbels of tiny yellow flowers in summer. Dill is quite a short lived plant so consider planting new plants every three or four months. Avoid drying out and consider planting in part shade during hot summers. Harvest frequently by simply cutting the leaves and use fresh or dried.Gather the seeds in summer. Dill may cross pollinate with Fennel if planted close by. Dill can attract beneficial insects such as ladybirds that prey on aphids so its a great choice for the garden. 
    Delicious used in fish dishes, add to pickling mixes, use in egg or potato dishes. 

      

    Fennel

    Fennel are annual plants consisting of tall clumps of erect hollow stems with a bulbous base with a distinct aniseed flavour. Fennel leaves are great for use in the kitchen and can be harvested at any time although the base takes around 120 days to form. grow it in an open, sunny position. It requires rich soil for good bulb development so add plenty of manure. Fennel also likes the soil to be well-drained and although the plants themselves are fairly drought tolerant to encourage  large bulbs, ensure they have plenty of water. Slice stems and steam as a vegetable with chicken or fish. Slice the base and cook with olive oil.
    Planting fennel is also said to repel fleas.

    Lemon Balm

    Lemon Balm is a spreading perennial herb with bright green leaves with a delicious lemon scent. Start harvesting the leaves as soon as plant is large enough and cut it right back every year to maintain bush shape.Attracts bees so plant amongst vegetable garden. Leaves can be used fresh, dry or can be frozen.
    Fantastic to use with chicken or fish by adding leaves when baking.Freeze in ice cubes and add to cold drinks for a delicious and refreshing twist.

     

    Lemongrass

    Lemongrass is a perennial plant with narrow, ribbon-like, leafy stalks that grow in large clumps with a distinctive lemon fragrance. For best results divide the plant late in winter to rejuvenate it prior to the growing season. To harvest pick leaves or remove portions of the stem as required. Plant around outdoor entertaining area as lemongrass is an excellent insect repellent. Citronella oil is made from lemon grass. The edible part of this plant is the white base of the stem although the leaves can be used to bind fish or other meats while cooking.  Lemongrass can also be frozen. great for Thai/ Vietnamese style dishes as weel as other Asian cuisine. Lemongrass is also wonderful as a tea by itself or combined with Ginger. 

    Mint

    Mint loves moisture and most are perennials with an invasive tendency so we recommend that you plant mint in pots instead of the garden. Any large container is suitable as long as the potting mix used is able to hold moisture well. If rust appears or plant looks lanky, cut down very hard and cover with compost and throw leaves in bin.  Mint is so versatile in the kitchen from adding to peas. potatoes, mint sauce for a lamb roast, try adding a few mint leaves to green tea or mocktails and cocktails.
    Fresh or dried mint will also deter ants from the pantry and repel clothes moth.

     

    Oregano

    Oregano is a hardy, spreading, perennial ground cover with woody stems and leaves that turn deep yellow when in full sun in summer. To get the best results use organic compost around the centre of the plant in winter which will encourage new growth come spring. Oregano is best harvested in warmer months and used fresh although leaves can be dried and used all year round. Great used in Italian dishes and Mediterranean cuisine, pair with most meats, lovely in soups and with fish. other uses are to use this plant as a ground cover where it will act as a "living mulch" or use it in rockeries for a lovely effect.  

     

    Parsley Curly

    This biennial variety has crisp, tightly curled foliage with a dark green colour and vigorous growth habit. For great results remember to add lots of organic matter and water well and let the plant self -seed in its second year of growth. By harvesting the outside leaves frequently you will encourage new growth from the centre of the plant. Parsley is reputed to have the richest source of iron of any vegetable so it is definitely worth considering for your garden. Leaves can be used in a variety of ways, to add freshness to sauces & dressings, as a garnish or in Italian or Mediterranean style dishes. Great mixed with butter and garlic for garlic bread or over meat. Leaves can be either dried, frozen or fresh. Other uses include using fresh parlsey to freshen breath.

    Parsley Italian

    Also known as Continental Parsley this biennial variety has plain, flat leafed foliage with a dark green colour and vigorous growth. For great results remember to add lots of organic matter and water well and let the plant self -seed in its second year of growth. By harvesting the outside leaves frequently you will encourage new growth from the centre of the plant. Parsley is reputed to have the richest source of iron of any vegetable so it is definitely worth considering for your garden. This variety is often preferred for cooking because it has a smoother, stronger flavour than curly variety. Leaves can be used in a variety of ways, to add freshness to sauces & dressings, as a garnish or in Italian or Mediterranean style dishes. Great mixed with butter and garlic for garlic bread or over meat. Leaves can be either dried, frozen or fresh. Other uses include using fresh parlsey to freshen breath.

    Rocket

    Rocket is an oily-peppery flavoured salad green with long toothed, purplish-green foliage and a mustard like taste.It is a very fast growing annual so its great if you're wanting quick results. Harvest the leaves when they are young (approx under 10cm long) as they can become bitter after flowering. Rocket may self-seed in other parts of the garden but it’s easy to remove if needed. Rocket grows best in the cooler months as heat can cause the plant to bolt to seed and the better the soil, the better the results. Great to use in salad dishes or with eggs for a fresh take on breakfast. use in pastas burgers, sandwiches and our personal fave sprinkled uncooked over fresh cooked pizza.

     

    Rosemary

    Rosemary is an evergreen, perennial, woody shrub with needle like, glossy green leaves and pale blue flowers in spring. It is very hardy and will tolerate drought and salty environments. Rosemary also is an excellent hedging plant. to get the best flavour, plant rosemary in full sun,keep it on the drier side and don’t fertilise. Great for repelling mosquitos so plant them around your alfresco entertaining area. Harvest at any time by cutting the stems at your desired length. Use fresh or dry by hanging in bunches in warm, airy room. fantastic to use with lamb and other meats, in marinades & dressings. Infuse in olive oil for a wonderful flavoured oil or a novel idea is to use cut stems as meat or vegetable skewers on the barbecue. 

     

    Sage

    Small, woody perennial shrub with velvety, grey-green leaves and pink flowers in spring. For best results give your sage plant a deep soaking once a week and provide a complete fertiliser in spring.You can start harvesting the sage leaves early. Sage will attract nectar-loving birds and butterflies to your garden.Leaves can be dried or frozen for up to 6 months. Sage leaves are lovely to use in stuffings, with meat especially white meat like pork or chicken.

    Thyme

    Thyme prefers plenty of sun and don’t feed or water it too much as it needs the chance to develop the oil in its leaves which gives it the flavour that we want in cooking. If it gets leggy, prune it back by about half and then cover the base of it with compost or potting mix which will help to rejuvenate it so that it will last for many years. Thyme is great to use in many Italian dishes, especially in tomato based sauces. This herb can also be used in landscaping as it makes a great ground cover when mass planted and its colours offset other plants beautifully. 

     

     
    DISCLAIMER - The information provided on this website is to be used as a guide only. We do not recommend any one plant variety in preference to another and all information is believed to be correct and is the result of private enquiries and experiences and are given in good faith. Uscape gives notice that; Uscape, employees included, disclaim all responsibility for any harm, loss, cost or damage resulting from the use of, or reliance upon, the whole or part of any information contained on this website if any part of the information is inaccurate or incomplete. Photos are NOT of current stock and is displayed only for illustration purposes as a representation of the variety.