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    There are few things more satisfying than growing your own vegetables. Not only do they taste better but you also know where they have come from and what they have been exposed to. Whether you're a beginner or a seasoned vegetable grower here's some of our top picks for your veggie patch. Read on and you'll be growing your own and enjoying your homegrown produce in no time!

    Feeling Inspired? Come on in to Uscape and browse our full range, our lovely garden gurus are on hand to answer any questions and offer great advice to help you get the most out of your garden!

    For your convenience these are separated into the following planting seasons: Autumn/Winter Planting & Spring/Summer Planting. 

     

     Autumn/Winter Planting

    Beetroot

    Beetroot is a root vegetable that shares a family line with silverbeet, a main difference being that silverbeet is grown for its leaves and the beetroot primarily for the bulb. Beetroot can be planted throughout the year, however, it is recommended to plant in autumn and spring when the temperature and climate is moderate. The key to Juicy beetroot is plenty of water.

    Broccoli

    Choose a sunny position for Broccoli, protected from strong winds. When sowing seedlings, leave about 40cm between each plant. Broccoli likes a well-drained soil, full of well-rotted compost and organic matter. Water Broccoli deeply and often, ensuring water reaches the roots. These will be ready for harvesting from 12 weeks or more. Look for firm, tight, well-formed heads that have not begun to flower. Cut off heads with a sharp knife as required.

    Carrot

    The trick to growing straight carrots is all in the preparation. Like many root vegetables they like a very friable soil but also compost and minerals. Avoid using manure as this will cause forking early on. Two weeks before planting your seed, dig over the soil with compost and coco peat and rock dust. Drench the area with a seaweed solution with added wetting agent. thin carrot seedlings out to 5cm spacings. Carrots like to be kept moist but not wet.

     

     

     

     

    Cauliflower

    Choose a sunny position for Cauliflower, protected from strong winds. When sowing seedlings, leave about 40cm between each plant. Cauliflower likes a well-drained soil, full of well-rotted compost and organic matter. Water Cauliflower deeply and often, ensuring water reaches the roots. These will take anywhere from 12 weeks upwards before they are ready to harvest. Look for firm, tight, well-formed heads that have not begun to flower. Cut off heads with a sharp knife as required.

     

    Garlic

    Garlic is a popular & relatively easy to grow crop.  It likes a humus rich soil which must be well drained. Dig through soil improvers (compost, etc) and clay - if you have very sandy soil prior to planting.  We only stock local and organically grown garlic. Plant the individual cloves (pointy side up!) at approx. the same depth as the bulb anytime from autumn to spring, 15cm between plants. Plants will take 6-9 months until maturity (depending on the variety and the season), and are harvested once the leaves and flowers die back - usually in late spring or summer. Then the bulbs should be removed from the ground and hung to dry.  As a companion plant, garlic helps to confuse insect pests and is a popular choice for interplanting with roses, brassicas (eg. cabbage and broccoli), and fruit trees.

    Quick garlic spray recipe: Roughly chop 10 regular cloves of garlic and soak overnight in 1L of warm water.Strain and use within a few days.

      

    Kale

    Kale likes a well drained, fertile soil. Before planting add compost, aged manure and rock dust. Kale is reputed to be one of the healthiest vegies you can have, packed with antioxidants, vitamins and a wide range of minerals. Mostly it is grown over winter, when it is more naturally 'in season'. In fact, cold temperatures make the leaves even sweeter! Normally the younger leaves are eaten, as the older leaves tend to be coarse and can be a bit bitter. Pick kale from the sides, leaving the centre to continue to grow and produce leaves. Kale Chips-Wash and pat dry leaves, tearing into large pieces. Toss in olive oil, salt and cayenne pepper (if desired). Lay on baking paper on tray in a single layer and bake at approx. 220 degrees C for about 15 minutes (keep an eye on them so they don't burn).

    Leek

    Leeks have the mildest and sweetest flavour of the onion family, and there are lots of ways you can enjoy them in cooking. In the garden, they are a fun and easy crop to grow, and can be left in the ground for a long period in most areas, so you don’t have to use them all at once. Leeks grow in a wide range of soils but like a well-drained soil moderately rich in humus. Leeks grow best in full sun but will tolerate part shade. Dig planting trenches or rows 20cm deep and 20-30cm apart, Separate and plant seedlings 10-20cm apart along the trench then as the plants grow, gradually backfill the soil in the trench to cover and blanch the lower stems. Water regularly and harvest when you feel they have reached a good size to cook with (ideal size around 2.5cm).

     

    Lettuce

    The quicker lettuce grows, the more tender and sweet it is. They are great for pots and containers. Lettuces like to be kept moist so keep them well watered, especially on warm days. You don’t need to pick the whole lettuce. You can pick off some of the outer leaves as you need them, remembering to break the leaves off near the base. Picking these leaves also helps to keep the lettuce growing for longer. If growing from seed don’t sow any deeper than 3mm as they may not be able to grow.

     

    Onion

    Onions are a very versatile, easy to grow vegetable that can be grown from seed most of the year. Onions can take at least six months to mature, so you will require some patience! Spring onions however are very quick growing, and are a rewarding veggie all year round. They do not need a particularly rich soil, although beds prepared with aged compost are fine. Plant in a sunny spot.

     

    Silverbeet

    Silverbeet is distantly related to spinach, but is more closely related to beetroot. Silverbeet tends to be easier to grow than spinach, particularly in warmer weather and can successfully be grown in pots and planter bags too. Young leaves can be used in salads, or else the vegetable can be lightly steamed or added to a stir fry. While normally the coarse stems are discarded, all parts of the plant are edible.

    Spinach

    Spinach loves the cold, so it’s one of the most popular vegie choices for autumn sowing. Spinach prefers a rich, rather heavy soil, so dig in plenty of organic matter (compost or aged manure) before sowing. Well fed and watered spinach grows quite quickly and can be ready to pick in as little as 8-10 weeks. In very cold weather, however, growth may be slower.

     

     Spring/Summer Planting

    Beans

    Beans are very easy to grow and like most veggies, beans prefer a sunny position.  So sun’s a necessity, as is good drainage. As members of the legume family, beans can make use of nitrogen in their surrounding atmosphere, so it’s important not to over fertilise. Bush beans - also known as dwarf or french beans - can be grown in rows, filling any spare spaces. Climbing beans - also known as runner beans - will make use of vertical structures such as fences and trellis.

    Beetroot

    Beetroot is a root vegetable that shares a family line with silverbeet, a main difference being that silverbeet is grown for its leaves and the beetroot primarily for the bulb. Beetroot can be planted throughout the year, however, it is recommended to plant in autumn and spring when the temperature and climate is moderate. The key to Juicy beetroot is plenty of water.

     

    Capsicum

    To grow capsicums, prepare the soil with manure and compost and a mineral-based fertiliser to encourage lots of fruit. In summer protect them from the full sun as the fruit can get sunburnt. Morning sun then dappled shade is ideal, or you can erect light shadecloth. Keep soil moist to promote fruiting leavi as much foliage as possible to protect the fruit. You may need to stake them as they grow.

     

    Carrots

    The trick to growing straight carrots is all in the preparation. Like many root vegetables they like a  very friable soil but also compost and minerals. Avoid using manure as this will cause forking early on. Two weeks before planting your seed, dig over the soil with compost and coco peat and rock dust. Drench the area with a seaweed solution with added wetting agent. thin carrot seedlings out to 5cm spacings. Carrots like to be kept moist but not wet.

     

    Chilli

    A great ornamental addition to your garden and packed with flavour, chillies are well suited to the growing conditions here. Chillies like full sun, especially the smaller types and they need plenty of water. They'll grow in pots or an open garden and they need to be regularly fertilised. Because there are so many varieties of chilli, we recommend that you refer to their product label, with its specific information so you’ll know when it is time to harvest.  Once picked, chillies will not ripen any further.

     

    Corn

    Corn is the giant of the vegie patch and fun to grow, Many varieties will quickly grow to 2m tall or more. Corn needs plenty of moisture and feeding to keep them going, but it’s well worth the effort. Corn also needs plenty of sunshine to thrive – at least 6 hours a day is ideal. Strong winds can damage tall plants so choose a protected spot. The soil needs to be very well-prepared and enriched.

     

    Cucumber

    Cucumbers like a rich, open organic soil with excellent drainage. A great way to grow cucumbers is to install a 1-2m-high trellis at planting to support vines and fruit. This saves space and keeps fruit off the ground. Plant in the Spring when the sun warms in full suns and protected from strong winds. They prefer a slightly acid soil that is very free draining. They develop a deep root system and will need ample water and liquid fertilising until the cucumbers are well formed. Always cut back the main leaders to encourage the development of female flowers. You should be able to  harvest around 7 weeks.

     

    Lettuce

    The quicker lettuce grows, the more tender and sweet it is. They are great for pots and containers. Lettuces like to be kept moist so keep them well watered, especially on warm days. You don’t need to pick the whole lettuce. You can pick off some of the outer leaves as you need them, remembering to break the leaves off near the base. Picking these leaves also helps to keep the lettuce growing for longer. If growing from seed don’t sow any deeper than 3mm as they may not be able to grow.

     

    Rainbow Chard

    Silverbeet Five Colour or Rainbow Chard is one of the most popular silverbeets for the home gardener. Rainbow chard is so easy to grow and will even grow in dappled shade. Place plants 60cm apart; this allows enough room for them to develop larger leaves.

     

    Rhubarb

    Rhubarb likes enriched soil (feed it up with compost and poo) and keep it well mulched over summer.  It will wilt and show you it needs a drink in the warmer months.  Plant in full sun to part shade, Rhubarb will also grow well in a large pot, and you can then move it around to suit the seasons. Rhubarb is available in seedling form for a large part of the year, and as crowns in winter. Remember: Rhubarb roots and leaves are both poisonous, so never eat these parts of the plant.  Use the discarded rhubarb leaves to make an insect spray, suitable for aphids and other sap sucking insects. Boil leaves (ratio of about 1:10) with water, and add about half a cup full of pure soap flakes.  Allow to cool, and strain.  Use immediately. 

     

    Snow Peas

    Snow peas prefer a well limed, free draining soil and a sunny to part shade aspect. Snow peas are vigorous plants and trellising is necessary to manage the growth, to keep the pods off the ground and to facilitate harvesting Harvest them often to encourage further flowering and more pods. Pick snow peas before they start to mature, otherwise the peas in the pods will swell up and they'll lose some their unique taste. Harvest your Snow Peas usually in around 8 weeks.

     

    Tomatoes

    Tomatoes like a rich, improved soil and are hungry feeders.  Don't over feed them nitrogen rich fertilisers (eg. chicken manure) as this encourages more leaf growth over fruiting.  Use well rotted sheep and cow manures, and give them potash once a month to encourage flowering and fruit set.  Do mulch plants over summer and ensure regular watering.  If the soil is allowed to dry out, plants will stress and be more susceptible to problems.

     

    Tomatoes Cherry

    Great for gardeners with limited space cherry tomatoes are equally at home in pots as well as the garden. Don't over feed them nitrogen rich fertilisers (eg. chicken manure) as this encourages more leaf growth over fruiting. Use well rotted sheep and cow manures, and give them potash once a month to encourage flowering and fruit set. Mulch well and don't let them dry out. Stake the plants as needed.  

     

    Zucchini

    Zucchini has the reputation of being an easy to grow vegetable. It is also great for those who want fast results with seed to first harvest only five weeks. It’s a good ides to build up your soil with compost, manure, minerals and a quality fertiliser as zucchinis produce loads of fruit and will need nutrients to go the distance.

    DISCLAIMER - The information provided on this website is to be used as a guide only. We do not recommend any one plant variety in preference to another and all information is believed to be correct and is the result of private enquiries and experiences and are given in good faith. Uscape gives notice that; Uscape, employees included, disclaim all responsibility for any harm, loss, cost or damage resulting from the use of, or reliance upon, the whole or part of any information contained on this website if any part of the information is inaccurate or incomplete. Photos are NOT of current stock and is displayed only for illustration purposes as a representation of the variety.